Maggie's Farm intervista
ELLIOTT MURPHY


ELLIOTT MURPHY INTERVIEW
a cura di Michele Murino


 
 

Versione in inglese
(per la versione in italiano vai più giù in questa stessa pagina)

Maggie's Farm: How it was that you decided to be a musician?

Elliott Murphy: I WAS HYPERACTIVE, BORED, LIVING THE PRIVLIGED LIFE OF AN AMERICAN BOURGEOISIE WHITE BOY YET STILL FEELLING OPPRESSED, STRANGELY ALLIENATED AND LEFT OUT IN GENERAL.  COULDN'T CONCENTRATE IN SCHOOL AND GENERALLY GIVING MY TEACHERS A HARD TIME SO MY MOTHER JOSEPHINE STARTED TAKING GUITAR LESSONS WITH ME.  EACH WEEK WE DROVE TO QUIGLEY’S MUSIC STORE IN NEW HYDE PARK AND PLAYED OLD FOLK AND COWBOY SONGS; THREE CHORD WONDERS LIKE “SHE’LL BE COMING ‘ROUND THE MOUNTAIN.”  FOR ME IT WAS LIKE GOING TO HEAVEN ONCE A WEEK AND I WAS 12 YEARS OLD AND I JUST FELL IN LOVE WITH THE INSTRUMENT, EVERYTHING ABOUT IT FROM THE CASE TO THE STRINGS, AND MY SCHOOLWORK WENT TO HELL.  BESIDES FROM GETTING MY FIRST GUITAR (WHICH WAS A HARMONY ACOUSTIC WITH A PICKUP ON IT) I THINK THE MOMENT I BECAME A PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN WAS WHEN I BOUGHT MY FIRST GUITAR STRAP AND REALIZED THAT I COULD PLAY THE DAMN THING STANDING UP AND MAYBE GOD WILLING SINGING ALONG.
 

Was there was a particular moment, a particular kind of experience that made you say: I want to be a songwriter, I want to be a musician for the rest of my life?

I WROTE A SONG WHEN I WAS VERY YOUNG – I STILL REMEMBER IT AND COULD SING IT TO YOU NOW.  IT WAS CALLED "WAS IT A DREAM?" - AND IT CAME SO QUICKLY TO ME, SO EFFORTLESSLY AND NATURAL.  IN FACT, SINCE THAT DAY IT HAS BEEN EASIER FOR ME TO WRITE MY OWN SONGS THAN TO LEARN THE SONGS OF OTHERS.  BUT I THINK WHEN I WAS PLAYING ON THE STREETS IN EUROPE IN 1971 WAS WHEN I STARTED IMAGINING MYSELF AS A TRUE SONGWRITER AND AS A POET ONCE SAID IN DREAMS BEGIN RESPONSIBILITY.  BUT THE GREAT THING ABOUT PLAYING COVER TUNES ACOUSTICALLY IS THAT YOU SOON BEGIN TO UNDERSTAND SONG STRUCTURE AND THE EMOTIONAL IMPACT OF AN OPEN E CHORD OR THE BAROQUE NATURE OF THE SUSPENDED D CHORD OR THE POPULAR QUALITY OF SONGS IN THE KEY OF C.  AND YOU BECOME CERTAIN ABOUT WHAT IS A VERSE AND WHAT IS A CHORUS AND WHEN AND WHY A BRIDGE IS SOMETIMES NECESSARY.  ROCK 'N ROLL SONGS AND FOLK SONGS AND BLUES AND MOST POP SONGS ALL LIVE WITHIN VERY SIMPLE YET TIGHTLY DEFINED STRUCTURES AND I WAS ATRRACTED TO THAT. IN FACT, ROCK ‘N ROLL IS A VERY CONSERVATIVE ARTFORM REALLY, WITH LESS FOOTWORK THAN CLASSICAL BALLET

Which were your major musical influences while you were growin’ up?

THE CHIPMONKS, MICKEY MOUSE CLUB, PERRY COMO, JOHNNY MATHIS, JOHNNY SMITH, KINGSTON TRIO, PETER PAUL AND MARY, THE VENTURES, DAVE CLARK FIVE, WILSON PICKETT, SHANGRA LA'S, DION.  BUT MOSTLY MY MOTHER’S SINGING AND MY FATHER’S PIANO PLAYING

How important is still for you the beat generation experience, that ‘on the road’ feeling that made you move around europe when you were young? and what about the ‘lost generation’?

I'M STILL ON THE ROAD ON AND OFF MOST OF THE YEAR SO I GUESS I MUST LIKE IT ALTHOUGH I PROBABLY WOULDN’T ADMIT IT.  BUT I LIKE MOVIN' AROUND, NEW CITIES, CLUBS, FACES AND I DON'T LIKE TO BE PINNED DOWN MUSICALLY.  THE LAST TIME I HAD A STEADY  CLUB GIG I ALMOST DIED AND I DON’T THINK I WOULD JOIN THE DAVID LETTERMAN BAND IF THEY ASKED ME EVEN THOUGH IT’S A VERY COOL GROUP OF CATS.  MY ROAD EXPERIENCE IS SO MUCH DIFFERENT THAN THAT OF JACK KEROUAC BECAUSE WHEN I’M OUT THERE I'M WORKING AND I'M STAYING IN HOTELS AND I HAVE PEOPLE TAKING CARE OF ME BUT IT'S STILL A TROUBADOUR WAY OF LIFE.  IF SOMEONE LOOKS BACK ON WHAT I’M DOING A HUNDRED YEARS FROM NOW THEY’LL PROBABLY SAY ITS VERY PRIMITIVE.  I’M SURE IN THE FUTURE THEY WILL FIND A WAY OF BRINGING THE PUBLIC TO THE PERFORMERS AND BEING ON THE ROAD WILL BE AS EXTINCT AS VAUDEVILLE SHOWS.  I PLAY THE SMALL TOWNS AND THE BIG CITIES, THE FESTIVALS AND THE TINY CLUBS AND I LOVE THEM ALL AND I DRIVE FOR 8 HOURS TO PLAY FOR 2 AND ITS WORTH IT.  I'M AN EXPATRIATE AT HEART - I'M MORE AT HOME WHEN I'M NOT AT HOME.  I NEVER HAD THE DESIRE TO DO THE PRODIGIAL SON ROUTINE AND MAKE IT BIG AND MOVE BACK TO MY HOME TOWN OF GARDEN CITY AND BUY THE BIGGEST MANSION IN THE PLACE AND RUB IT IN EVERYBODY'S FACE.  BECAUSE THEN THEY WIN, DON'T THEY?  THEY GOT YOU PINNED DOWN.

Some people tend to define albums like Aquashow, Murph the Surf, and Change Will Come among your better albums: do you agree?

I DON'T KNOW... AQUASHOW WAS MY FIRST ALBUM AND FIRST ALBUMS ARE REALLY SPECIAL NO MATTER WHO YOU ARE.  AND I GOT REALLY THROWN FOR A LOOP WITH ALL THE DYLAN/REED/FITZGERALD COMPARISONS THAT I WASN'T EXPECTING OR READY FOR.  IN 1972 I WENT INTO RECORD PLANT STUDIO NOT EXPECTING ANY REACTION FROM ANYBODY AND I WAS SCARED AS HELL.  I HAD ALREADY TRIED TO RECORD IN LOS ANGELES AND IT WAS A DISASTER.  I WAS RECOVERING FROM HEPATITIS AND COULDN’T DRINK ALCOHOL AND POLYDOR HAD FIRED MY BAND AND ME AND MY BROTHER WERE LIVING IN MANHATTAN LIKE GYPSIES IN SWANKY HOTELS WITH OUR LONG ISLAND GIRLFRIENDS.  I SUPPOSE MURPH THE SURF SHOULD HAVE BEEN MY 5TH MAJOR LABEL ALBUM IF COLUMBIA HADN’T DROPPED ME.  THESE ARE GLORIFIED DEMOS BUT THE BAND WAS TIGHT FROM SO MANY MAX’S KANSAS CITY GIGS.  CHANGE WILL COME WAS HALF A GREAT ALBUM AND I PROBABLY SHOULD HAVE WORKED MORE ON SOME OF THE SONGS BUT I LIKE INSTANT THRILLS. STILL I THINK CHANGE WILL COME WAS UNDERRATED WHEN IT CAME OUT.  PEOPLE SHOULD GIVE IT ANOTHER LISTEN...  BUT I THINK SOUL SURFING (MY LAST) IS AS GOOD AS ANTYHING I'VE EVERY DONE.  I NEVER WANTED TO BE RIMBAUD AND BURN OUT YOUNG.  I ALWAYS RESPECTED THE MUSICIANS, WRITERS, PAINTERS WHO SURVIVED A WILD YOUTH AND FLOURISHED: PICASSO, MUDDY WATERS, GRAHAM GREENE. YOU KNOW WHAT?  ITS EASY TO BE A GENIUS WHEN YOU’RE 25 BUT TRY DOING IT AT 50.

How much important is in your songwriting your love for literature?

TO ME SONGWRITING IS LITERATURE.  INSIDE EVERY SONG I WRITE THERE IS A NOVEL AND A MOVIE WAITING TO BE MADE.  I COULD TELL YOU THE CASTING FOR EVERY ONE OF THEM.  DRIVE ALL NIGHT STARRING BRUCE DERN; ANASTASIA WITH NATALIE WOOD; SMALL ROOM WITH CHARLIE CHAPLIN…I COULD GO ON AND ON.

Which writers are most important for you?

OH THE USUAL SUSPECTS AND SOME SURPRISES: FITZGERALD, HEMINGWAY, HENRY MILLER, JAMES SALTER, JOHN UPDIKE, KEROUAC, GRAHAM GREENE, TRUMAN CAPOTE, NORMAN MAILER, MARK TWAIN, EMILY DICKINSON, EDNA ST VINCENT MILLAY, PATTI SMITH, MARGUERITE DURAS, JOYCE CAROL OATES, FLAUBERT, JAY MCINERNEY, RICHARD TILLINGAST...ASK ME NEXT WEEK AND I’LL GIVE YOU A TOTALLY NEW LIST.  WRITERS ARE LIKE CONSTELLATIONS IN THE SKY.

In a tv show you said: ‘Literature is my religion, but rock’n’roll is my addiciton’...

AND I MEANT IT.

You were so lucky to meet Federico Fellini and to work with him for his Roma movie, back in the early 70s. You dedicated to him your song Is Fellini really dead? Can you tell us some stories about this particoular experience?

I CAME TO EUROPE ON A CHEAP TICKET BECAUSE MY SISTER MICHELLE WAS A BEAUTIFUL STEWARDESS ON PAN AM AND I LANDED IN AMSTERDAM AND SMOKED ENOUGH HASHISH TO LAST ME THE REST OF MY LIFE AND WENT TO PARIS AND FUCKED ALL THE HOOKERS IN PIGALLE I COULD AFFORD AND THEN TOOK A LONG DRY TRAIN TO ROMA AND I MET FARLEY GRANGER WHO WAS AN AMERICAN MOVIE STAR WHO HAD WORKED FOR HITCHCOCK AND I WAS BROKE AND  HUNGRY FOR FAME AND HE TOLD ME TO GO TO CINECITTA AND SEE WHO WAS SHOOTING AND SO I TOOK THE BUS OUT THERE AND SOMEONE SAID FELLINI WAS LOOKING FOR HIPPIE EXTRAS SO I WENT TO A ROOM AND SAT THERE AND FINALLY HE OPENED THE DOOR AND SAID OK AND I GOT THE JOB AND REPORTED FOR WORK AT 8 IN THE MORNING AND THEY STARTED SHOOTING AT 8 AT NIGHT AND FELLINI PUT HIS HAND ON MY SHOULDER AND SAID “YOUNG BOY STAND HERE” AND I HAVEN’T WASHED MY SHOULDER SINCE AND UNFORTUNATELY MY GREAT SCENE OF WHEN I WAS SITTING ON A HARLEY DAVISON AND TALKING TO TWO BEAUTIFUL BABES WAS CUT FROM THE FILM BUT I HAVE NO REGRETS AND YEARS LATER LONG AFTER ROMA CAME OUT AND YOU COULD SEE ME CLEARLY FOR ABOUT 10 SECONDS I WROTE A LETTER TO FELLINI AND SEND HIM A CD AND HE WROTE ME BACK WITHIN A WEEK LIKE THE GREAT MAN HE WAS AND I HUNG THAT LETTER UP ON MY WALL AND THEN SIX MONTHS LATER HE WAS DEAD AND WHEN I WAS NEXT IN ROME IT SEEMED LIKE A DIFFERENT CITY LIKE IT COULND’T REALLY EXIST WITHOUT FELLINI AND I WENT TO TRASTEVERE AND STARTED WRITING THIS SONG IS FELLINI REALLY DEAD AND THE FIRST LINE WAS “ROME’S A MILLION YEARS OF TOURISTS” AND I THINK I HEARD FELLINI LAUGH.

Your relationship with big major labels was not so.. happy.. would you like to tell us something about this, as well as the records business?

I HAD PRETTY GOOD RELATIONS WITH ALL MY MAJOR LABELS EXCEPT FOR COLUMBIA WHICH WAS IRONIC BECAUSE THEY WERE SUPPOSE TO BE THE MOST ARTIST FRIENDLY AND THEY DROPPED ME.  BUT I HOLD NO REGRETS BECAUSE MOST OF MY PROBLEMS I CAUSED MYSELF ALTHOUGH PERHAPS I REFUSED TO PLAY THE GAME BECAUSE I WAS SO OUT OF IT THAT I DIDN’T EVEN KNOW THE GAME EXISTED.  THE MUSIC BUSINESS HAS CHANGED SO MUCH IN SOME WAYS THAT ITS HARD TO SAY ANTHING.  TO BE SURE THE MUSIC OF THE 60’S, THAT GREAT CULTURAL REVOLUTION, TOOK THE LABELS BY SURPRISE AND THEY JUST TRIED TO FOLLOW THE  MONEY PATH LIKE A GROUP OF BLOODHOUNDS BUT THEN AFTER THE NEED FOR REVOULTIONARY MUSIC WAS OVER (AND DON’T ASK ME WHY THIS HAPPENED – IT JUST DID) THEY TRIED TO CREATE THEIR OWN PATH AND FOLLOW THAT LIKE BLOODHOUNDS AND IT HAS LED THEM TO NOWHERE LIKE DOGS WHO HAVE LOST THE SCENT AND THEY’RE ALL SITTING AROUND PISSING ON EACH OTHER AND HOWLING AT THE MOON.  NOW PEOPLE DON’T WANT TO PAY FOR MUSIC AND MUSIC BIZ EXECUTIVES AND ARTISTS AND MANAGERS STILL WANT TO LIVE LIKE KINGS AND QUEENS SO I DON’T KNOW WHAT WILL HAPPEN.

Do you know some italian musician?

I KNOW GRAZIANO ROMANI AND LORENZO BERTOCCHINI

Which artists, not italian, you like to listen to?

I ONLY LISTEN TO JEWEL WHEN I’M ALONE.

Can you tell us something briefly about your novel Cold and electric?

I WROTE IT AFTER COLUMBIA DROPPED ME IN 1977 AND I WAS WALKING DOWN 57TH STREET AND RAN INTO JANN WENNER THE PUBLISHER OF ROLLING STONE AND HE ASKED ME WHAT I WAS DOING AND WHEN I TOLD HIM THAT I WAS WRITING A NOVEL HE AGREED TO PUT PART OF IT IN THE MAGAZINE WHICH WAS VERY NICE OF HIM.  ITS ABOUT A GUITARIST NAMED MARTY MAY WHO CLIMBED UP THE ROCK ‘N ROLL MOUNTAIN THE HARD WAY AND THEN FELL DOWN THE OTHER SIDE THE EASY WAY INTO OBSCURITY.  ITS NOT ABOUT ME BUT ITS ABOUT A TIME AND PLACE I KNOW TOO WELL.  IT’S A NOVEL THAT SPEAKS WITH THE AUTHORITY OF FAILURE WHICH IS AS TRUE AS IT GETS.  EVERY SUCCESS STORY YOU’RE EVER GONNA READ IS PURE BULLSHIT BUT YOU KNOW THAT ALREADY.

Would you like to say something about your close friendship with Bruce Springsteen?

NO

The september 11th tragedy: it was your city, too: how you deal with that?

 I COULDN’T SING FOR A WHILE AND HAD TO CANCEL SOME GIGS.  I READ POETRY AND WATCHED CNN AND GOT MAD AND SCARED AND WONDERED WHERE ON THIS EARTH ME AND MY FAMILY WOULD BE SAFE. LAST CHRISTMAS I VISITED GROUND ZERO AND COULD SMELL THE DEATH IN THE AIR AND LOOKING AT ALL THE “HAVE YOU SEEN MY HUSBAND/BROTHER/SISTER/FATHER/MOTHER/COUSIN/GIRLFRIEND/BOYRFRIEND/PARTNER? SIGNS MADE ME CRY. BUT IT COULD HAVE HAPPENED ANYWHERE AND I WOULD HAVE FELT THE SAME.  I HAD NO SPECIAL FEELING FOR IT BECAUSE IT WAS NEW YORK EXCEPT THAT THE WORLD TRADE CENTERS WENT UP IN 1973 WHICH WAS THE YEAR OF MY FIRST ALBUM SO I HAD SOME SPECIAL WATERMARK RELATIONSHIP WITH THEM.  I NEVER CARED FOR THE BUILDINGS SO MUCH.

This is a website dedicated to Bob Dylan, can you tell us something about  your recent meeting with him, in Paris?

I DIDN’T MEET HIM.  I WAS BACKSTAGE AFTER HIS SHOW AND HE WAS THERE AND I WAS TALKING WITH TONY GARNIER HIS BASSIST BUT I DIDN’T GO UP TO HIM BECAUSE I WOULDN’T KNOW WHERE TO BEGIN.

Being named the ‘new Bob Dylan’ was something good or bad, for you?

THEY SAY IT’S A CURSE BUT ALL THE NEW BOB DYLANS THAT I CAN THINK OF ARE STILL WORKING.

Which are, if there is any, the common things musically speaking you and Dylan have?

AT THIS POINT ITS HARD TO SAY BECAUSE I DON’T KNOW WHAT COMMON INFLUENCES WE HAVE OR WHERE I HAVE BEEN INFLUENCED BY HIM ALTHOUGH I DOUBT IF I HAVE INFLUENCED HIM.  WE BOTH HAVE A HIGH REGARD ABOUT THE VERBAL POSSIBILITIES OF ROCK ‘N ROLL AND WE BOTH WRITE LONG SONGS.

How did you liked Love & Theft?

NOT SO MUCH AT FIRST BUT NOW I LOVE IT AND PLAY IT CONSTANTLY.  KIND OF LIKE HOW I FELT ABOUT EXILE ON MAIN STREET.

After all those years, you still runnin’ around the world playin your music: what it is that make you still wanting to go out and playing another show

THE PRETTY GIRLS IN THE FRONT ROW

Are you working on a new album or on a new book?

YES, OF COURSE.


Maggie's Farm intervista
ELLIOTT MURPHY

a cura di Michele Murino

Maggie's Farm: Come e quando sei entrato nel mondo musicale? Qual è stata la spinta iniziale per la quale hai deciso di intraprendere la carriera di songwriter e di performer?

Elliott Murphy: Ero iperattivo, annoiato, vivevo la vita privilegiata di un ragazzo bianco della borghesia americana e tuttavia mi sentivo oppresso, sranamente alienato e comunque emarginato.
Non riuscivo a concentrarmi a scuola ed in genere davo problemi ai miei insegnanti così mia madre Josephine iniziò a prendere lezioni di chitarra con me. Ogni settimana andavamo al negozio di musica "Quigley's" sito in New Hyde Park e suonavo vecchie canzoni folk e western. Meraviglie su tre accordi come "She'll be coming 'round the mountain". Per me era come andare in paradiso una volta la settimana ed avevo solo 12 anni e mi ero proprio innamorato dello strumento, amavo tutto di esso dalla custodia alle corde, ed il mio lavoro scolastico lo mandai a quel paese.
Inoltre da quando presi la mia prima chitarra (che era una chitarra acustica con un pickup) credo che il momento in cui son diventato un musicista professionista è stato quando ho comprato la mia prima chitarra con cinghia e capii che potevo suonare quell'accidente stando in piedi e cantare.

C'è stato un momento particolare, un particolare tipo di esperienza che ti ha fatto dire: "Voglio diventare un songwriter, voglio essere un musicista per il resto della mia vita"?

Scrissi una canzone quando ero giovanissimo - me la ricordo ancora e potrei cantarla anche ora. Si intitolava "Was it a dream?" ("Era un sogno?") - e mi venne velocemente, senza sforzi ed in maniera naturale. In effetti fin da quel giorno è stato facile per me scrivere le mie canzoni piuttosto che imparare le canzoni degli altri. Ma credo che sia stato quando suonavo nelle strade d'Europa nel 1971 che cominciai a pensare a me stesso come ad un vero songwriter e come un poeta. Ma la cosa grande nel suonare canzoni acustiche è che ci si rende conto subito della struttura della canzone e dell'impatto emozionale di un accordo in sol aperto o la natura barocca di un accordo in fa o la qualità popolare di canzoni in chiave di mi. E ti rendi conto di cosa è in realtà un verso e cosa è un coro e quando e perchè un ritornello è a volte necessario. Le canzoni rock'n'roll e le canzoni folk e quelle blues e la maggior parte delle canzoni pop vivono tutte all'interno di strutture molto semplici e tuttavia strettamente definite ed ero attratto da ciò. Di fatto il rock'n'roll è una forma di arte davvero molto conservatrice, con meno lavoro di piedi del balletto classico.

Quali sono state le tue maggiori influenze musicali durante i tuoi primi anni di musicista?

The Chipmonks, Mickey Mouse Club, Perry Como, Johnny Mathis, Johnny Smith, Kingston Trio, Peter Paul and Mary, The Ventures, Dave Clark Five, Wilson Pickett, Shangra La's, Dion. Ma soprattutto le canzoni di mia madre e la musica che mio padre suonava al piano

Come ricordi dopo tanti anni il periodo cosiddetto "on the road" che ti portò tra l'altro in Europa ed in Italia? Il periodo della "lost generation" e della "beat generation"...

Io sono ancora "on the road" la maggior parte dell'anno perciò suppongo che ancora mi piaccia sebbene probabilmente non vorrei ammetterlo. Ma mi piace andare in giro, vedere nuove città, nuovi locali, nuovi visi e non mi piace rimanere fossilizzato da un punto di vista musicale. L'ultima volta che ho suonato in un posto fisso sono quasi morto e non penso che mi piacerebbe persino unirmi alla band del David Letterman Show se me lo chiedessero anche se si tratta di un ottimo gruppo di persone.
La mia esperienza sulla strada è molto differente rispetto a quella di Jack Kerouac perchè quando sono in giro io lavoro e sto in alberghi ed ho persone che si prendono cura di me ma è ancora uno stile di vita da trovatore. Se qualcuno tra cento anni guardasse indietro a quello che sto facendo ora probabilmente direbbe che è molto primitivo. Sono sicuro che in futuro troveranno il modo di portare il pubblico dall'artista ed essere sulla strada sarà una cosa estinta come gli spettacoli di vaudeville.
Io suono nelle piccole città e nelle grandi metropoli, ai festival e nei piccoli clubs e adoro entrambe le cose e guido per otto ore per suonarne due. Sono un espatriato in fondo - mi sento più a casa quando non sono a casa. Non ho mai avuto il desiderio di fare il figliol prodigo e ritornare alla mia città natale di Garden City e comprare la casa più grande del posto. Perchè altrimenti ti arrendi. Sei fossilizzato.

Tra i tuoi lavori vengono soprattutto considerati dischi come "Aquashow", "Lost Generation", "Murph the Surph" e "Change will come". Sei d'accordo con questa ipotetica classifica?...

Non saprei. Aquashow è stato il mio primo album ed i primi album sono davvero speciali, non importa chi tu sia. Ed io ho subìto davvero tutti quei paragoni con Dylan/Reed/Fitzgerald che proprio non mi aspettavo o per cui non ero pronto. Nel 1972 sono andato in sala di registrazione e non mi aspettavo alcuna reazione da parte di nessuno ed ero terrorizzato. Avevo già provato a registrare a Los Angeles ed era stato un disastro. Mi stavo rimettendo da un'epatite e non potevo bere alcool ed io e i miei fratelli vivevamo a Manhattan come zingari in sfarzosi hotels con le nostre ragazze di Long Island. Credo che Murph the Surf sarebbe stato un grande successo se la Columbia non mi avesse scaricato. Si tratta di demo glorificati ma la band era stanca per così tanti concerti a Kansas City. Change will come fu un grande album a metà e probabilmente avrei dovuto lavorare di più su alcune canzoni ma mi piacciono i brividi istantanei. Ancora credo però che Change will come sia stato sottovalutato quando è uscito. La gente dovrebbe dargli un secondo ascolto. Comunque credo che Soul Surfing (il mio ultimo album) sia buono quanto nessun altro che io abbia mai realizzato. Non ho mai voluto essere Rimbaud e morire giovane. Ho sempre rispettato i musicisti, gli scrittori, i pittori che sono sopravvissuti ad una gioventù selvaggia e sono fioriti: Picasso, Muddy Waters, Graham Greene. Lo sapete? E' facile essere un genio a 25 anni ma provate ad esserlo a 50.

Nel tuo modo di comporre canzoni quanto peso ha l'interesse letterario?

Per me scrivere canzoni è letteratura. In ogni canzone che scrivo c'è un romanzo ed un film in attesa di essere realizzati. Potrei fare il casting per ognuna di esse. Drive all night con Bruce Dern; Anastasia con Natalie Wood; Small room con Charlie Chaplin... Potrei proseguire all'infinito.

Quali scrittori hai come punto di riferimento?

Oh i soliti sospetti e qualche sorpresa: Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Henry Miller, James Salter, John Updike, Kerouac, Graham Greene, Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Edna St Vincent, Patti Smith, Margherite Duras, Joyce Carol Oates, Flaubert, Jay McInerney, Richard Tillingast... Fammi la domanda la prossima settimana e ti darò una lista completamente differente. Gli scrittori sono come le costellazioni nel cielo

Ho letto che in uno show televisivo hai dichiarato: “Literature is my religion, but rock’n’roll is my addiction.” (La letteratura è la mia religione ma il rock'n'roll è la mia droga)

Ed intendevo proprio quello.

Hai avuto la fortuna di conoscere Federico Fellini e di lavorare come attore in un suo film, "Roma" nel 1972... Gli hai anche dedicato il brano Is Fellini Really Dead?... Ci puoi raccontare qualche aneddoto al riguardo?...

Venni in Europa a basso prezzo perchè mia sorella Michelle era una bellissima hostess per la Pan Am ed atterrai ad Amsterdam dove fumai abbastanza hasisch da bastarmi per il resto della mia vita. Andai a Parigi e scopai tutte le puttane di Pigalle che mi potei permettere poi presi un lungo e secco treno per Roma ed incontrai Farley Granger che era una star del cinema americano che aveva lavorato per Hitchcock ed io ero affamato di gloria ed egli mi disse di andare a Cinecittà e di vedere cosa si girava e così presi l'autobus ed arrivai lì e qualcuno mi disse che Fellini stava cercando degli hippies così entrai in una stanza mi sedetti ed infine lui aprì la porta e disse ok ed io ebbi il lavoro e mi presentai alle riprese alle otto del mattino e loro iniziarono a girare alle otto di sera e Fellini mi mise una mano sulla spalla e disse "Ragazzo mettiti qui" ed io non ho più lavato la mia spalla da allora e sfortunatamente una mia grande scena in cui ero seduto su di una Harley Davidson e parlavo con due bellissime ragazze  fu tagliata nel montaggio finale del film ma non ho rimpianti e molti anni dopo "Roma" uscì e mi si potè vedere chiaramente per almeno dieci secondi. Scrissi una lettera a Fellini e gli mandai un cd ed egli mi rispose nel giro di una settimana da quel grande uomo che era ed io appesi quella lettera sulla parete di casa mia e sei mesi dopo Fellini era morto e quando tornai a Roma mi sembrò una città diversa quasi come se non potesse esistere senza Fellini. Andai a Trastevere ed iniziai a scrivere la mia canzone "Is Fellini Really Dead?" (E' veramente morto Fellini?) ed il primo verso era "Rome's a million years of tourists" e mi sembrò di sentire Fellini ridere.

In passato il rapporto con le Case Discografiche maggiori ti ha creato problemi... Puoi parlarci di questo argomento?...

Io ho avuto buoni rapporti con tutte le mie etichette maggiori tranne la Columbia il che è ironico dal momento che si suppone che fosse quella che trattava più amichevolmente gli artisti ed invece mi ha scaricato.
Ma non ho rimpianti perchè mi sono procurato da solo la maggior parte dei miei problemi ad esempio rifiutandomi di entrare nel gioco perchè ne ero così fuori che nemmeno sapevo esistesse un gioco.
Il mondo musicale è cambiato così tanto che è difficile dire qualcosa. Di certo la musica degli anni 60, quella grande rivoluzione culturale, prese le case discografiche di sorpresa e queste ultime tentarono di seguire la pista del denaro come un gruppo di segugi ma dopo un pò la richiesta di musica rivoluzionaria cessò (e non chiedermi perchè è successo - è successo e basta). Cercarono di creare un proprio sentiero e di seguirlo come segugi e questo li ha portati a niente, come cani che hanno perso la traccia e si sono seduti e si fanno la pipì addosso uno con gli altri e latrano alla luna.
Ora la gente non vuole pagare per la musica ed ancora gli esecutivi del Music Biz e gli artisti ed i managers vogliono vivere come re e regine perciò non so cosa succederà.

Conosci o segui artisti italiani?

Conosco Graziano Romani e Lorenzo Bertocchini.

Quali artisti segui attualmente?...

Ascolto solo Jewel quando sono solo.

Hai scritto un romanzo dal titolo Cold and electric. Ce ne puoi parlare brevemente?

L'ho scritto dopo che la Columbia mi ha scaricato nel 1977 e me ne andavo camminando lungo la 57ma strada e mi imbattei in Jann Wenner l'editore di Rolling Stone che mi chiese che stavo facendo e quando gli dissi che stavo scrivendo un romanzo accettò di pubblicarne parte sulla sua rivista. Il romanzo parla di un chitarrista di nome Marty May che ha scalato la montagna del Rock'n'Roll nella maniera più dura e poi è caduto facilmente dall'altra parte nell'oscurità. Non è autobiografico ma riguarda un luogo ed un tempo che conosco troppo bene. E' un romanzo che parla con l'autorità del fallimento. Ogni storia di successo che tu abbia mai letto è pura merda ma tu lo sai già.

Hai un rapporto privilegiato con Bruce Springsteen con il quale hai duettato in diverse occasioni... Ce ne puoi parlare?

No

I recenti tragici avvenimenti che hanno colpito la tua città, New York, in che misura ti hanno colpito anche da un punto di vista artistico...

Non sono riuscito a cantare per un pò di tempo ed ho cancellato alcune date. Ho letto poesie ed ho guardato la CNN e sono impazzito e mi sono terrorizzato e mi sono chiesto in quale luogo sulla terra io e la mia famiglia potremmo essere al sicuro. Lo scorso Natale ho visitato Ground Zero e potevo sentire l'odore di morte nell'aria e guardando tutti quei cartelli "Avete visto mio marito/fratello/sorella/madre/cugino/ragazza/fidanzato/compagno?" mi è venuto da piangere. Ma poteva succedere dovunque e mi sarei sentito allo stesso modo. Non ho provato particolari sensazioni per il fatto che fosse New York se non per il fatto che il World Trade Center è stato costruito nel 1973 l'anno in cui è uscito il mio primo album così io avevo una sorta di collegamento speciale con esso. Non mi sono mai preoccupato in questo modo per gli edifici.

Il sito che curo nasce nel nome di Bob Dylan, un artista da te molto amato ed al quale sei stato spesso accostato dalla critica e dai discografici... Puoi dirci qualcosa del tuo recente incontro con lui a Parigi?

Non l'ho incontrato. Ero nel backstage dopo il suo show e lui era lì mentre parlavo con Tony Garnier, il suo bassista, ma non mi sono avvicinato a lui perchè non avrei saputo da dove iniziare

Ti ha fatto piacere in passato essere considerato il "nuovo Bob Dylan" o piuttosto ti ha creato difficoltà?

Dicono che sia una maledizione ma tutti i "Nuovi Bob Dylan" che posso immaginarmi stanno ancora lavorando

Quali punti di contatto ritieni che leghino le vostre rispettive opere?

A questo punto è difficile dirlo perchè non so quali influenze comuni abbiamo o dove io sono stato influenzato da lui sebbene io dubiti di aver influenzato lui. Abbiamo entrambi una grande considerazione circa le possibilità verbali del rock'n'roll ed entrambi scriviamo canzoni molto lunghe.

Come giudichi gli ultimi lavori di Dylan ed in particolare l'ultimo album "Love and Theft"?...

Inizialmente non mi aveva colpito ma ora lo adoro e lo ascolto di continuo. Ho provato la stessa sensazione con Exile on main street dei Rolling Stones

Cosa ti spinge dopo tanti anni a girare ancora il mondo per fare del rock'n'roll?

Le belle ragazze in prima fila

Stai lavorando ad un nuovo album o ad un nuovo libro?

Naturalmente sì.

Grazie per il tempo che ci hai dedicato ed un saluto a nome dei fans italiani che leggeranno questa intervista sulle pagine di "Maggie's Farm".
Michele Murino


        Elliott Murphy, cantante, poeta, giornalista, scrittore e bohemien, è nato a New York ma
        residente a Parigi. Emigrato dalla grande mela e dalle grandi discografiche multinazionali, è
        considerato uno dei piú appassionati, colti ed intelligenti compositori di rock. I suoi ammiratori
        nel mondo della musica sono innumerevoli, da Peter Buck dei R.E.M. a Lou Reed, Tom Petty,
        John Mellencamp ed Elvis Costello. In uno dei suoi ultimi album collabora Bruce Springsteen e
        con il Boss canta una canzone ­ Everything I do - messa provocatoriamente in rete in
        formato Mp3. Vive a Parigi, lungo La Senna, con la moglie Francoise e un figlio piccolo, Gaspard.
        Va in tour in Francia, Spagna, Italia, Germania e Scandinavia, questo quando non scrive. Le sue
        collezioni di storie brevi e un romanzo sono stati pubblicati in Europa negli ultimi anni. Oltre
        che con Springsteen, Elliott Murphy ha collaborato tra l'altro con membri delle Violent Femmes,
        Smithereens, Talking Heads, Velvet Underground, la neo-folk Shawn Colvin, Phil Collins e Billy
        Joel. Durante il suo ultimo tour Europeo Bruce Springsteen suono' a Parigi e chiese a Elliott di
        unirsi a lui sul palco, per interpretare insieme una versione acustica del cavallo di battaglia di
        Murphy Rock Ballad. Attore di cinema per Federico Fellini, ha fatto infiniti tour.

DISCOGRAFIA

Albums

1.AQUASHOW,  1973
2.LOST GENERATION,  1975
3.NIGHT LIGHTS,  1976
4.JUST A STORY FROM AMERICA,  1977
5.AFFAIRS,  1980
6.MURPH THE SURF,  1982
7.PARTY GIRLS AND BROKEN POETS,  1984
8.MILWAUKEE,  1986
9.APRÈS LE DÉLUGE,  1987
10.CHANGE WILL COME, 1988
11.LIVE HOT POINT,  1989
12."12",  1990
13.IF POETS WERE KING, 1991

14.SELLING THE GOLD, 1995
15.BEAUREGARD,  1998

16.APRIL, Live Album, 1999
17.RAINY SEASON, 2000

18.LA TERRE COMMUNE (con Iain Matthews), 2000
19.LAST OF THE ROCK STARS (live 2-CD), 2001

20.SOUL SURFING, 2002

La versione in vinile uscita per il mercato tedesco di "Soul Surfing" contiene il brano di Bob Dylan "If You See Her Say Hello" e l'inedita "Bilbao Bo Diddly".

Compilations

1.DIAMONDS BY THE YARD, 1992
2.UNREAL CITY, 1993
3.GOING THROUGH SOMETHING, 1997
4.PARIS-NEW YORK, 1993
5.EVERYDAY IS A HOLLYDAY
6.SOMEWHERE IN THESE NIGHTLIGHTS
7.LIVE AT KREMLIN



 

La dedica di Elliott Murphy a MF (To Maggie's Farm - "Ain't gonna work there...")
(La pagina qui sopra è tratta dalla prefazione scritta da Elliot Murphy per il volume di Paolo Vites dal titolo
"Bob Dylan 1962 -2002 40 anni di canzoni" - pubblicato da  Editori Riuniti)



Per saperne di più su Elliot Murphy consigliamo il volume "Alias Bob Dylan" - L'odissea dei Nuovi Dylan - di Marco Denti (Selene Edizioni)
 
 
ALIAS BOB DYLAN
L'odissea dei Nuovi Dylan
Elliott Murphy - John Prine - James Talley - Dirk Hamilton - Steve Forbert - Willie Nile

Autore: Marco Denti
Editore: Selene Edizioni
202 pp. - 12.39 euro

I 9 capitoli del volume sono dedicati rispettivamente a: Bob Dylan, Elliot Murphy, John Prine, James Talley, Dirk Hamilton, Steve Forbert, Willie Nile, Altri Alias, Bruce Springsteen

Dalla prefazione del libro:

Sono tempi difficili. Una mossa falsa e ti ritrovi indietro di un anno o
più. Non te lo puoi permettere. I grafici si muovono troppo in fretta.
Ogni settimana c'è una nuova stella. E tu non vuoi essere
un coglione qualunque.
Tu vuoi qualcosa di solido, qualcosa che duri.
Sam Shepard, Rockstar, 1974

Cominciare da zero, sulla strada, con una chitarra e un'armo-
nica e trovare fortuna, fama, successo. Diventare una rock-
star. Era questo il sogno. Oggi forse è cambiato qualche detta-
glio, ma la sostanza è ancora quella. Dietro l'angolo però c'è
sempre in agguato un'ombra negativa, cupa, drammatica, un'e-
sistenza consumata per errore, per un abbaglio, per uno scherzo
del destino o per un scambio di persona. Fa parte della storia
del rock'n'roll, fin dai suoi primordiali inizi, pascolare in questa
terra di nessuno e se è onesto ammettere che, come diceva
Robert Coover, "abbiamo bisogno di miti", è altrettanto vero e
facile fare confusione, soprattutto con un personaggio volubile e
complesso come Bob Dylan. Per questo bisogna distinguere fin
dall'inizio i contorni dell'idea stessa rappresentata dal Nuovo
Dylan. C' erano lavori in corso per un nuovo Bob Dylan, ovvero
una delle tanti fasi di una carriera lunghissima e a tratti indi-
stinguibile dalla sua stessa vita. Allen Ginsberg fu probabilmen-
te tra i primi ad accorgersi della sua evoluzione e della svolta
che era nell'aria, come scrisse, con la consueta poetica,
nelle riviste undeground St. Louis Outlaw e nel Georgia Straight il
25 maggio 1971: "Bob Dylan si sta integrando in un background
americano classico, in parte politico e in parte psico-politico. Se
può integrare se stesso nella musica southern, country &
western, folk, automobile-truck-stop e radicarsi con forza in que-
sta musica, allora qualsiasi cosa sviluppata al di fuori di essa
rappresenterà una base realmente vasta e universale. Qualunque
messaggio o comunicazione egli trasmetta attraverso quel tipo
di musica potrebbe essere bellissimo. Penso che lo stia già
facendo. Quando si hanno poeti veramente grandi come
Rimbaud o Dylan, bisogna semplicemente fidarsi di loro per
affrontare cambiamenti, per i quali nessuno sarà più come
prima. 


Selene Edizioni
via Bazzini, 24 - 20131 Milano
tel. 02. 26.68.17.38
fax 02. 59.61.11.12
email: selene@micronet.it

si ringrazia Paolo Vites per la collaborazione



 
MAGGIE'S FARM

sito italiano di Bob Dylan

HOME PAGE
Clicca qui

 

--------------------
è  una produzione
TIGHT CONNECTION
--------------------